Architecture News | International High Rise Award

Every two years, the City of Frankfurt, in conjunction with the German Architecture Museum, awards the International Highrise Award. Winners are chosen based on the structure’s exemplary sustainability, external shape, and internal spatial and social qualities.

 What the Award Signifies

This prestigious award recognizes outstanding innovation in design and building technology, integration into the urban landscape, and functionality, sustainability and cost-effectiveness in the construction of tall buildings. It is unique because it acknowledges the collaboration between architects and developers that can result in outstanding modern buildings. It awards projects that are architectural achievements and also enhance the lives of the people in and around them.

2016 Award – VIA 57 West

Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award
Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award

The International Highrise Award has been bestowed seven times since 2004, and this year, New York’s residential high-rise VIA 57 West was the honored recipient.

This unusual “courtscraper,” envisioned by the architectural firm BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group) and built by The Durst Organization, faced many site challenges.

Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award
Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award

The site, in Hell’s Kitchen, is bound on four sides by problematic constraints:

  • To the west, the site is separated from the Hudson River by a multilane highway.
  • To the north, there’s a historical electricity plant.
  • To the south, a newly built waste-sorting center creates noise and odors.
  • To the east stands a conventional 130-meter-high residential tower, and its view of the Hudson River could not be obstructed.

The architects responded with a building that rises from three low corners to one high point, transitioning between the low-rise structures in the south and the high-rises in the north. Their solution to preserving the view of the nearby tower was to incorporate a courtyard that also brings afternoon sun deep into the building and extends the greenery of the adjacent Hudson River Park.

Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award
Image courtesy archdaily.com/798590/bigs-via-57-west-wins-the-2016-international-highrise-award

When presenting the award, architecture critic and curator Bart Lootsma described the foundational basis of BIG’s design this way: “The quality of the projects by Bjarke Ingels and BIG in large part does not stem from the way they look, but rather from how they are created and what they achieve.” The defining achievement of VIA 57 West is its unparalleled blending of a stunning high-density building with human elements that encourage interaction between residents and passersby.

Architecture | Three Iconic Architects That Have Changed New York City

Living in New York City among some of the tallest skyscrapers can make a person feel small. It’s easy to forget that among these man-made canyons lies some of the most creative architecture in the world. Three architects in particular have designed buildings in New York that add a dash of modern flair and organic interest to the cityscape.

1. Frank Lloyd Wright

Image courtesy guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building
Image courtesy guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building
Frank Lloyd Wright began his career in Chicago and the Midwest, where he designed homes in the Prairie style, which celebrated indigenous American materials and worked to tie architecture into the landscape rather than to European traditions. As he aged, his work became increasingly experimental.
Image courtesy guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building
Image courtesy guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building
The capstone building of Wright’s career is the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum right here in Manhattan. Wright died before the completion of this modern wonder, a rising spiral gallery in which guests are treated to a building as beautiful as the artwork it holds. The privately owned Crimson Beech house is the only residence of Wright’s design built in New York City; it’s interior is not open to the public, but it can be viewed from the street on Staten Island.

2. Frank Gehry

Image  courtesy designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/Frank_Gehry
Image courtesy designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/Frank_Gehry
Born in Toronto in 1929, Los Angeles-based architect Frank Gehry is perhaps the most famous living designer. He dropped out Harvard and moved to Southern California, where he designed homes in an increasingly radical Deconstructivist style. His buildings are known for demolishing architectural norms, such as right angles and straight lines, preferring instead to challenge the notion that form must follow function.
Image courtesy architecturaldigest.com/gallery/best-of-frank-gehry-slideshow/all
Image courtesy architecturaldigest.com
Gehry’s highly imaginative style can be seen all over Manhattan, most notably in the Issey Miyake flagship store, where the interior features Gehry’s signature shiny, undulating metallic panels. Gehry’s first skyscraper also resides in NYC at 8 Spruce St., where its wavering lines rise up from the street like smoke along its 76 stories.

3. David Childs

Image courtesy aia.org/practicing/aiab090856
Image courtesy aia.org/practicing/aiab090856

It’s hard to find an architect who’s more of a real New Yorker than David Childs. Though he was born in Princeton, N.J., in 1941, he spent most of his formative years in Bedford Village, N.Y. Today, he lives on the Upper West Side. As the chairman emeritus of the architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, he has overseen many prominent buildings in New York, including the arrivals terminal at JFK and several buildings in Times Square.

Image courtesy aia.org/practicing/aiab090856
Image courtesy aia.org/practicing/aiab090856

It’s impossible to miss his biggest stamp on New York City, though: the Freedom Tower at One World Trade Center. This shining beacon — complete with a spire that rises to a symbolic 1,776 feet — is one of the most recognizable buildings in New York.

Green Architecture | Five of the Most Sustainable Buildings Around the World

As companies grow increasingly aware of their impact on the environment, many are learning to evolve into more sustainable, eco-friendly businesses. One way this is being achieved is through architecture. With a constructive overhaul, businesses can make their space energy efficient and less wasteful, thereby lessening their environmental impact. Read on to learn about five such sustainable buildings and how they are shaping the future of architecture.

1. The Edge, Amsterdam

Image courtesy thinkmarketingmagazine.com/edge-amsterdam-innovative-office-building-world/
Image courtesy thinkmarketingmagazine.com/edge-amsterdam-innovative-office-building-world/

Hailed as one of the most sustainable constructs in the world, The Edge office building is truly remarkable. Its outer construction is almost entirely glass, making it brim with natural lighting to keep energy costs low. Additionally, the building uses a combination of solar and aquifer thermal energy to heat, cool and provide for other energy needs. Employees can even control the lighting and temperature in their workspaces using an app on their phones, so that nothing goes to waste in rooms that are not in use.

2. The Bullitt Center, Seattle

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When done correctly, going green should cut costs considerably, and that’s exactly what The Bullitt Center has proven. This Seattle office building actually creates more energy than it uses, with its super-efficient geo-thermal wells and solar panels that provide all the energy the structure could ever need – and more. The center even uses composting toilets to reduce water use, and recycles its runoff water from sinks.

3. The NuOffice, Munich

Image courtesy newatlas.com/nuoffice-sustainable-office/
Image courtesy newatlas.com/nuoffice-sustainable-office/

The idea behind having a green office is defeated if its workers are creating a massive carbon footprint to get there, so NuOffice sought to solve this problem. They encourage public transportation use and provide electric car charging stations for those with environmentally-friendly vehicles. The building itself has been rated one of the world’s greenest. Its entire roof is a solar construct to provide energy, and its LED lights sense how much daylight is in the room at a given time and turn on and off accordingly.

4. 41 Cooper Square, New York City

Image courtesy arch2o.com/41-cooper-square-morphosis/
Image courtesy arch2o.com/41-cooper-square-morphosis/

Innovative in both design and sustainability, 41 Cooper Square has a plethora of green features. The unique building collects rainwater for reuse, utilizes 75 percent natural lighting, and controls temperatures via the perforated stainless steel exterior. These aspects combined with its creative visual aspect make 41 Cooper Square an amazing contribution to the realm of green architecture.

5. The Crystal, London

Image courtesy www.thecrystal.org/about/press/
Image courtesy www.thecrystal.org/about/press/

Aptly dubbed The Crystal for its geometric, mostly-glass construction, this center for Siemens research and development doesn’t let any energy to waste. It generates electricity from solar panels, and any excess is funneled into battery storage for later use. This center also collects rainwater to convert to drinking water, and uses natural ventilation from carefully-placed vents in the building.

 

New York City Architecture | Five Up-and-Coming Architectural Trends

For more than a century, New York City has been the epicenter of the world’s greatest architectural innovations. From the mansions of the Gilded Age to art deco wonders such as the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, New York City has been at the forefront of innovative architectural design.

As New York City moves into the first quarter of the 21st century, here are five architectural trends that are emerging within the city’s landscape:

1. Sleek Skyscrapers

Image courtesy 432parkavenue.com
Image courtesy 432parkavenue.com

New York City’s skyscrapers have gone on a diet — at least, that’s a metaphoric way to describe the pencil-thin, space-saving skyscrapers cropping up throughout Manhattan and the Financial District. The most famous example is Rafael Vinoly’s 432 Park Avenue, which, at 1,396 feet, is the tallest residential building in the Western Hemisphere. According to 2016 prices, apartments in these slenderized skyscrapers can cost as much as $11,000 per square foot, while penthouses can go for up to $95 million.

2. Skybridges

Image courtesy  dezeen.com
Image courtesy dezeen.com

With the creation of the city’s first new skybridge in 80 years, SHoP Architecture is reinventing the traditional urban walkway. Installed between the curving twin towers of the American Copper Buildings at First Avenue and 36th Street, the skybridge will house a stunning see-through pool, fitness center, bar and hot tub. At 626 First Avenue, JDS Developments is following suit with its “infinity edge pool” skybridge.

3. Green Roofs and Walls

Image courtesy  152elizabethst.com/vision
Image courtesy 152elizabethst.com/vision

The rooftop garden has long been a city tradition, but today’s architects are taking the concept even further. According to the U.S. Green Building Council, the number of buildings slated to be implemented with LEEDS-friendly installations such as green roofs and walls is expected to increase dramatically. Planted with vegetation, these installations reduce temperatures and provide significant energy savings. One of the city’s most dramatic new residential projects, Tadao Ando’s 152 Elizabeth Street, features a green wall measuring 55 feet high and 99 feet wide.

4. Amazing Water Features

Image courtesy adamson-associates.com
Image courtesy adamson-associates.com

Inspired by the Hearst Tower’s three-story waterfall “Icefall,” today’s architects continue to bring water elements indoors, using cascading fountains, elegant see-through skybridge pools and sensational water walls. Tadao Ando’s 152 Elizabeth Street project, for example, will feature a spectacular floor-to-ceiling water wall, encased in grooved glass panels.

5. Ground Floor Marketplaces

Replacing the traditional cavernous lobby, today’s ground floor spaces have been recreated as urban marketplaces, complete with art galleries, cafes and boutiques. For example, the Rudin Management-designed residential tower at 215 East 68th Street recently renovated its lobby to include a city icon, gourmet store Grace’s Marketplace.

Today, New York City continues to fuel the imaginations of the world’s greatest architects. As the 21st century moves forward, the city will continue to inspire elegant, sophisticated design concepts that combine functional, environmentally sustainable amenities with cutting-edge artistic vision.

Amenties: Four Amazing Green Spaces in NYC Residential Buildings

New York City is one of the most exciting places in the entire world to live. Just about anything a person could want can be found within the five boroughs, after a subway ride or sometimes even a short stroll. Of course, once in a while, residents need a respite from all the manic activity in the city and a chance to reconnect with nature. Many of the finest residential buildings in the city either incorporate or are adjacent to phenomenal and unexpected spaces. Here are four of the best residential outdoor escapes in the city.

1. Manhattan View at MiMA Tower
460 West 42nd Street between Ninth and Tenth avenues

Image courtesy manhattanview.com
Image courtesy manhattanview.com

The top 13 floors of this building feature 151 units priced between $1 million and approximately $6 million. The apartments contain fine finishes and jaw-dropping views of the city and the Hudson River. But it’s the three outdoor areas at the Manhattan View development that place it at the top of this list. The beautifully landscaped and furnished terraces provide an array of outdoor activities for residents. The south terrace has a vast lawn surrounded by chaise lounge chairs and a tremendous projector screen for movie viewings. The north terrace can be booked for private parties and has barbecue nooks and dining pods with plush chairs, while the third terrace has more spacious lounge areas.

2. 443 Greenwich Street
Between Vestry and Desbrosses streets in Tribeca

Image courtesy 443greenwich.com
Image courtesy 443greenwich.com

Containing 11 tulip trees, the 4,000-square-foot courtyard on the site of a renovated bookbinding warehouse at 443 Greenwich Street was designed by noted landscape architect Hank White — famous for his Brooklyn Botanic Gardens redux and other projects. Working around building constraints inhibiting natural light, White looked to the lower Hudson Valley woodlands for inspiration on plant life that can thrive and beautify in the setting. He settled on a layout that is “cloistered by glass and brick and lush with plantings,” and flowers, that “stands hidden in the heart of Tribeca — a secret garden, removed from the public noise of the city.

3. XOCO 325
325 West Broadway in SoHo

Image courtesy xoco325.com
Image courtesy xoco325.com

A building named “chocolate” — “xoco” is the Catalan word for the sweet treat — can do no wrong. In addition to the vertical gardens along the building’s cast aluminum and glass façade, stretching from the base of the building up to the penthouse, the renovated 19th Century Tootsie Roll factory features apartments ranging from 1,055 to 4,837 square feet, a state-of-the-art fitness center and a lovely secret garden. Residents of the new 21-unit building, which will be complete soon, will enjoy reading in the shade of the construct and strolling its patio-like promenade while taking in the fragrances of an assortment of flowers.

4. MacDougal-Sullivan Gardens
MacDougal and Sullivan streets between Houston and Bleecker streets

Town July Amenities News 4

 

The shared garden available to residents of 22 homes in Greenwich Village’s landmarked historic district on MacDougal and Sullivan streets is one of the most unique outdoor areas in all of Manhattan. Though a common green space, it is private, enclosed by the back ends of townhouses serving as homes to New York’s elite, helping to ensure discretion while generating intimacy. Initially, the communal garden was part of a slum, existing behind dilapidated row houses. In the 1920s, the residences and garden were renovated, with real estate investors primarily looking to attract artists as renters.

Architecture News: Bjarke Ingels’ Design for WTC 2 Building

 After sidestepping Foster + Partners to become Silverstein Properties’ choice to design the new WTC2 building in the Financial District, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) have released a plethora of impressive renderings of the project.

DBOX for BIG - WTC2 - Tribeca Morning
Image courtesy BIG.dk

Construction has already begun at the site where the building will stand: 200 Greenwich Street, bounded by Church Street to the east, Vesey Street to the north and Fulton Street to the south. The tower is expected to reach 1,270 feet, framing the 9/11 Memorial Park alongside three other buildings making up the new World Trade Center. Among the building’s 80 floors there will be 2.8 million rentable square feet of space and a 40-foot-tall lobby, stretching 38,000 square feet, that will connect to the WTC transit hub, providing direct access to 11 subway lines.

Town June Architecture News 2
Image courtesy BIG.dk

The WTC2 design is intended to complement the building’s urban context and blend in with the architecture of the outlying areas, like the modernist skyscrapers of the Financial District and the lofts and roof gardens of Tribeca. The design melds high-rise with low-rise, modern with historical.

Image courtesy BIG.dk
Image courtesy BIG.dk

Looking to the sky from the 9/11 Memorial at its base, WTC2 fits in easily among the adjacent tall and slender towers of the World Trade Center complex. A series of setbacks climb the building and echo the curved sides of 1 World Trade, a reference to the twin buildings that once stood in their place. Meanwhile, the view from Tribeca offers a series of green spaces as the setback terraces are planted, mirroring the green spaces of St. Paul’s Chapel below. 

Silverstein Properties valued the WTC2 design’s innovation and safety and stability measures. The building boasts cutting-edge tenant environments, along with flexible, highly efficient floor plans and state-of-the-art amenities, including basketball courts, a running track, a cafeteria and screening rooms. The building’s amenity floors will feed directly onto the terraced parks.

Town June Architecture News 4
Image courtesy BIG.dk

Providing an ideal environment for the sharing of ideas, there will be a diverse mix of open workplaces and informal meeting spaces. Stairwells between floors will feature cascading double-height communal space. At the foot of the building, a lush public plaza, will run adjacent to 350,000 square feet worth of shopping and restaurants. There will be multiple concourses, fostering community and collaboration throughout.

Town June Architecture News 5
Image courtesy BIG.dk

 

The lower half of the tower was set to operate as 21st Century Fox/News Corp’s new headquarters, housing their subsidiary companies and more than 5,000 workers. Unfortunately for Silverstein Properties, that deal fell apart earlier this year. But there’s time to bounce back, and BlackRock and JP Morgan Chase have been rumored as prospective renters, who may move in when the project is expected to be complete in 2021.

For more information and renderings, visit the architecture firm’s official website and see the architectural fact sheet on the developer’s official website

TOWN Green Architecture News: The Futuristic Open Ocean Pavilion of South Korea

In late March, the New York Times reported that an ice sheet in Western Antarctica is melting more rapidly than previously thought. Scientists speculate that sea levels can rise 6 feet if this one ice mass continues to melt at its current pace over the course of the next 85 years.  These predictions put cities set adjacent to the ocean in tremendous danger of flooding. The article listed New York, London, New Orleans, Miami and others among the major cities facing the highest flood risks. (One quote pointed out that New York has existed for 400 years, but the chance of it lasting another 400 is “remote.”) The same evening the New York Times article was published, a panel of experts gathered at the welcome center of the Miami Design Preservation League on Ocean Drive, to discuss ways Miami can save its buildings should sea levels continue to rise. One solution is to raise them three feet or more “above flood,” though cost estimates for such an undertaking involving a 2,000-square-foot home can reach six figures.

Town Miami Green Arch News 1
Image courtesy DanielValle.com

In an effort to raise awareness of the constant changes in sea levels as a result of global warming, Daniel Valle Architects designed “Water Pavilion,” a construct that allows visitors to walk either on the water’s surface or below it, depending upon the current level of the water.

Town Miami Green Arch News 2
Image courtesy DanielValle.com

Water Pavilion made its debut at the 2012 South Korean design expo called Yeosu. Originally intended for construction in Seoul, the project spans 30,000 square meters, which equates to nearly 323,000 square feet. According to the architect’s website, the concept of the project explores fluidity, buoyancy and constant change. “The pavilion stands on the unstable limit of sea level, changing its configuration according to various uses during the expo.”

Town Miami Green Arch News 3
Image courtesy DanielValle.com

The pavilion can actually float above the sea and host large gatherings or sit below it, facilitating up-close-and-personal marine observation exhibits or intimate events. The generated environment is deliberately unstable, meant to call attention to the changing sea levels resulting from global warming.

Town Miami Green Arch News 4
Image courtesy DanielValle.com

A cross section of the construct reveals that water runs through its “veins,” helping it shift positions. Tech Insider, which likens the structure’s functionality to that of a submarine, reports that the pavilion would also contain a purifying system that would turn saltwater into freshwater.

Town Miami Gren Arch News 5
Image courtesy DanielValle.com

The pavilion could become a pop-up attraction at any city waterfront, as its design allows it to undock from a port and travel elsewhere across the sea.

 

Town April Architecture News: The NYC Honorees of the 2016 AIANY Design Awards

Each year the New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIANY) honors a number of architects for their efforts in creating excellent and innovative architecture, interior design and urban planning projects. The recognized designers will have their projects on view at the Center For Architecture, located at 536 LaGuardia Place, beginning April 15 after a posh awards luncheon at Cipriani Wall Street. More than half of the projects that were honored this year were set within the five boroughs; here are details on some of the outstanding winners:

1. The Spring Street Salt Shed
Dattner Architects and WXY Architects

Town April Architecture News 1
Image courtesy dattner.com

Inspired by a grain of salt, the Spring Street Salt Shed at the intersection of Washington Street and Spring Street near the Holland Tunnel just became functional earlier this year. The 6,300-square-foot construct tapers toward the bottom, allowing for greater pedestrian space at ground level. About 5,000 tons of salt can be stored there, awaiting winter snowstorms and, ultimately, distribution across the city by the Department of Sanitation.

For more information, visit the architects’ official website.

2. St. Ann’s Warehouse
Marvel Architects

Town April Architecture News 2
Image courtesy marvelarchitects.com

The third home of St. Ann’s Warehouse—an organization that produces both theatrical performances and concerts—is located inside a tobacco warehouse originally built in 1860 along Brooklyn Bridge Park at 45 Water Street in Dumbo. Renovated by Marvel Architects, the new theater within the brick building’s very old walls offers dynamic staging options to resident companies, incorporating an interesting mix of materials, such as glass bricks, black steel and plywood.

For more information, visit the architect’s official website.

3. Carmel Place
nArchitects

Town April Architecture News 3
Image courtesy narchitects.com

The city’s first all-micro-unit building at 335 E. 27th St. in Kips Bay was designed by nArchitects as part of the MyMicroNY competition. Opening its doors to residents this year, the structure will house 55 apartments, none of which are larger than 350 square feet. Carmel Place’s layout stresses quality and livability through features that highlight the use of space, light and air. Ceiling heights reach nearly 10 feet and many apartments offer Juliet balconies. Amenities will include a gym, lounge, den, community room and public roof terrace, bicycle storage, tenant storage room and separate storage lockers are dispersed throughout the building, as well as a small garden.

For more information, visit the architect’s official website

4. St. Patrick’s Cathedral
Murphy, Burnham & Buttrick Architects

Town April Architecture News 4
Image courtesy mbbarch.com

Having already won a slew of awards for this renovation that began in 2012, Murphy, Burnham & Buttrick Architects just added AIANY’s Merit Award to their list of honors. The vast scope of the project included a refreshing of the landmark’s spires, refinishing of its ceiling, and a cleanup of the massive bronze front doors. All mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems were replaced and the complex is now heated and cooled with its very own nine-well geothermal plant. The team won a second Merit Award from AINY this year for their design of P.S. 330 in Flushing, Queens.

For more information, visit the architect’s official website.

5. The Whitney Museum at Gansevoort
Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper Robertson

Town April Architecture News 5
Image courtesyrpbw.com

Clad in pale blue-grey enamel steel panels, the new, eight-story Whitney Museum building in the Meatpacking District is as gorgeous as it is asymmetrical. Abutting the magical High Line, the new Whitney is entered via a massive cantilevered plaza with views of both the Hudson and the High Line. The lobby also serves as a public gallery with nearly 1,000 square feet of free-entry exhibition space. In addition to having flexible galleries spanning 50,000 square feet and multiple levels inside, the new museum also has 13,000 square feet of outdoor space for additional exhibits. This design team also won AIANY’s Merit Award. 

For more information, visit the architect’s official website.

For a complete list of AIANY’s winners, visit their official website

Town April Real Estate Neighborhood Spotlight: Central Park South

The New York City real estate market recently experienced a boom like few in the business have seen at any point in their careers. With the uptick in the economy after the 2008 downturn, people weren’t just buying properties, they were developing them as well, with plans for constructs to shoot higher into the city’s sky than ever before. No section of Manhattan saw more impressive development through this year than the streets abutting Central Park South.

Screen Shot 2016-03-23 at 11.43.19 AM
Image courtesy jdsdevelopment.com

For the better part of the last two years, pundits persistently preached that an increase of inventory was going to be needed to help ease soaring prices. In the Central Park South section of New York, the inventory has finally arrived. With the recent rise of uncertainty and volatility in the stock market combined with the influx of units in the neighborhood, this might be the best time in the past hundred years to buy in this section of Midtown.

New York Yimby declared 2016 to be “the biggest year ever for the Manhattan skyline,” and the majority of the buildings they highlighted were all located within just a few blocks of Central Park South. The ballyhooed, supertall One57 at 157 West 57th St. started the craze when it was completed in 2014. Even more attention was brought to the neighborhood when a penthouse in that same building became America’s first-ever $100 million apartment sale. The building’s website offers plenty of reasons why the building was such a hit, including panoramic city views that prominently feature the mighty Central Park.

Town April Neighborhood Spotlight 2
Image courtesy Robert A.M. Stern Architects

One57 briefly held the title of the city’s tallest building until 432 Park Avenue reached its peak height of 1,369 feet. Completed just this past December, 432 Park Avenue also stands on 57th Street, just three-and-a-half blocks from One57. The first sale at 432 Park Avenue was of apartment #35B in January. The 4,000-square-foot unit has three bedrooms and four-and-a-half bathrooms and sold for $18.116 million, which beat the $17.75 million asking price. Ten additional apartments were available at the time ranging from $17.4 to $44.25 million.

Town April Neighborhood Spotlight 3
Image courtesy newyorkyimby.com

New Yorkers can look forward to three more luxury residential buildings to begin making their mark on the skyline near Central Park South in the very near future. Vornado Realty Trustis developing 220 Central Park South. Designed by Robert A.M. Stern, the building is expected to top out somewhere between 920 and 950 feet in height, making it one of the tallest residential buildings in the United States. A landmarked annex to the Plaza Hotel off Fifth Avenue, sales have launched, and the building may be complete within the next 12 months. 2016 will be the second year of construction at 217 West 57th Street, aka the Nordstrom Tower or the Central Park Tower. The building will rise 1,550 feet, and, upon completion, it will become the second-tallest building in the city andin the country. Officially, it will be designated a mixed-use building, as Manhattan’s first flagship Nordstrom will be housed in the building’s seven-story base. JDS Development Group’s 111 West 57th Street is expected to open next year with a design that has already received positive reviews, and Jean Nouvel’s long-awaited 53W53 is expected to see residents move in some time in 2018.

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Image courtesy 53w53.com

The lower portion of Central Park may be the most beloved by New Yorkers with The Pond, Central Park Zoo, Victorian Gardens Amusement Park and carousel situated there. The famous midtown Apple Store with its iconic glass cube entrance and venerable Plaza Hotel anchor the southeast corner of the park, while Columbus Circle and the twin towers of the Time Warner Center stand at the southwest corner. High-profile restaurants, such as Marea, The Russian Tea Room, Per Se and Aquavit pepper the neighborhood. The Museum of Modern Art is just blocks away, and Carnegie Hall is centrally located, leading to the nearby theater district. The “Three Bs,” Barneys, Bergdorf’s and Bloomingdales and the shops at Time Warner Center set the stage for world-famous shopping near Central Park and further up the Madison Avenue and 57th Street corridors. Local transportation is effortless with nearly every subway line making stops in the immediate area.

Modern, sky-piercing luxury combined with all the classic institutions that made the area famous, not to mention amazing neighborhood amenities, make Central Park South truly remarkable—and still on the rise.

Town, Miami Green Architecture News: Miami’s Most Green Bungalow

Town Miami Green Arch News 1
Image courtesy ChristianWassmann.com

A Miami bungalow built in the 1930s has gotten the modern, green treatment from architect Christian Wassmann and his studio in a unique, environmentally conscientious extension.

Town Miami Green Arch News 2
Image courtesy ChristianWassmann.com

Called “The Sun Path House,” the dynamic three-story structure is made of concrete and features spiraling walls, a solarium, abundant natural light, greenery and open spaces. The intention behind the design was to create a serene living environment with subtly playful qualities as well.

Town Miami Green Arch News 3
Image courtesy ChristianWassmann.com

Though considered the new main living area on the property, the design studio’s website says the extension is “in dialogue” with the bungalow. There’s an expansive, open kitchen operating as a spatial connection to the original structure. Located at the top of the building, the solarium’s curved wall maps the path of the sun on the summer solstice, reflecting sunlight onto the surface of the adjacent deck all day.

Town Miami Green Arch News 4
Image courtesy ChristianWassmann.com

A spiraling wall, with structural, functional and aesthetic purposes, acts as the spine of the building, spanning all three floors, optimizing exposure to natural light and facilitating the growth of all the greenery. So as to face north, the top edge of the curved wall is rotated—in respect to the existing building—11.25 degrees. The middle of the wall, where the master bedroom is located, is parallel to the established house. On the ground floor the curvature is 11.25 degrees towards the middle of the garden, and the rotation point of this 22.5-degree twist is the central staircase leading to the top sundeck.

Town Miami Green Arch News 5
Image courtesy ChristianWassmann.com

The curved concrete wall also does a great job of deflecting wind, maintaining calm inside the structure. The sizable windows and outdoor spaces throughout offer the residents a sincere connection with nature. 

For more information and renderings, visit Inhabitat.com and ChristianWassmann.com